Category: Parole

Killer Peter Stark granted pass to leave prison

Peter Stark, a killer who disposed of the body of his teenage victim in an isolated, makeshift grave, was granted a “compassionate” pass to get out of prison to visit the grave of a dead friend. Stark, who was convicted of murdering 14-year-old Julie Stanton of Pickering, Ontario, was granted an escorted pass by the Parole Board of Canada that allowed him out of penitentiary last year, Cancrime learned. Police and prosecutors believe that Stark abducted, drugged and raped Julie, who was a friend of Stark’s teenage daughter, on April 16, 1990. Julie was last seen getting into a car with Stark on that day and it is believed he also had drugged and raped her a year earlier. Stark maintained his innocence but strong circumstantial evidence led to his conviction on December 1, 1994 for first-degree murder. He was sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 25 years. Julie’s remains were found 35 kilometres north of Pickering on June 27, 1996. Stark, from Stoney Creek, in the Hamilton area, was granted the escorted temporary absence, a short-term get-out-of-prison pass, after a decision in June 2012 by the Parole Board of Canada (read decision after jump), based on a recommendation from the Correctional Service of Canada.

(UPDATE: Stark died while still behind bars in August 2016.)

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Child sex predator Davidson-Brown isn’t an unusual case

UPDATED JAN. 14 Kingston Police announced early this morning that Davidson-Brown had left Kingston. They didn’t say where he was headed.

The case of child sex predator Eric William Davidson-Brown (inset) drew a torrent of attention on my social media channels. Since I posted his photo and the details announced by police of his release to Kingston, Ontario, the post has been shared more than 3,000 times and, by late on January 13, had drawn nearly 200 comments. I was surprised since Davidson-Brown isn’t really an unusual case. There are hundreds similar ex-convicts living on the street in Canadian communities every day.

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Ramage parole doc reveals info not disclosed at hearing

Rob RamageRarely have I seen surprising new information in the written record of a parole hearing I have attended, but it’s there in the internal document (read it after the jump) for paroled former pro hockey player Rob Ramage (inset). The onetime captain of the Toronto Maple Leafs recently won release to a halfway house after a hearing held at the Kingston, Ontario prison where’s serving his four-year prison sentence for driving drunk and killing a friend. The four-page parole document reveals that Ramage had a driving-related brush with the law while he was free on bail.

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Ex-NHLer Rob Ramage likely to get early parole

Rob RamageFormer NHL player Rob Ramage (inset) is likely to be paroled today, eight months after he began serving a four-year prison sentence. The one-time captain of the Toronto Maple Leafs went to prison in July last year after he lost an appeal of his conviction for driving drunk and crashing his car, killing his passenger and friend, former Chicago Blackhawks star defenceman Keith Magnuson.

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Faint hope reporting malfunction

The federal government wants to abolish the faint hope clause, a measure in the Criminal Code that allows imprisoned killers to ask to have their parole ineligibility reduced. The Tory government announced the get-tough measure today. It’s a fix for a perceived problem that affects a small percentage of murderers, as the government’s own graphic (above) reveals: It shows that less than two in every 10 jailed killers who is eligible to ask for an earlier parole date has had a decision rendered since the first faint hope hearing in 1987. The table above is excerpted from the Corrections and Conditional Release Statistical Overview, Annual Report 2008, published by the federal government. After the jump, a look at the important detail in the faint hope process that’s missing from many media reports.

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Government tripling price of pardons

The deadline is at hand. You have just one day to tell the National Parole Board what you think of the idea to jack up the price of pardon applications by 300%. The board says it can’t afford to keep processing applications at $50 a apiece, given projections that it will be handling 40,000 applications...

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Devious rapist Rene Bourdon evades supervision

Rene BourdonRapist Rene Bourdon (inset) was considered so dangerous when he was sentenced in North Bay in 2003 for attacks on three women that a judge imposed one of the most restrictive legal leashes available to rein in a sex offender’s deviancy – short of a life sentence in prison. But as Bourdon’s case has progressed, it’s clear there’s a significant loophole in the law that he’s exploiting.

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Predator with “overwhelming history of deviant sexual offending” free

Cancrime first introduced pedophile Walter Jacobson in December 2008 [first post]. After the jump, you’ll find a decade of decisions by parole authorities who struggled to control this persistent child predator when the courts failed to brand him a dangerous offender – a decision that could have kept him locked up indefinitely.

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