Tag: Kenneth McBain

Convict roundup puts final fugitive behind bars

I was remiss in not posting sooner that the motley crew above, all federal convicts who escaped in 2009 from the same federal prison in Kingston, are now all back behind bars. The last remaining fugitive from Frontenac Institution, Kenneth McBain (centre), was caught January 27 in Toronto by the Repeat Offender Parole Enforcement Unit (ROPE), a cross-province team of officers – Ontario’s version of the famed U.S. Marshals. The ROPE squad hunts federal parole violators and escapees.

You must subscribe to read all of this.
Log In Subscribe

And then there were three – escaped cons

The tally of violent cons to escape a minimum-security federal prison in Kingston has risen to three this year with the disappearance yesterday of Kevin Douglas Rice (above left). Rice was last seen at Frontenac Institution, a pen with no fences and no armed guards, at 8:15 a.m., November 26. Staff realized he was gone during a head count at 11:30 a.m. Other escapees this year are Kenneth McBain (centre), who bolted July 6 and is still on the loose and Andrew Wood (right), who was caught days after his escape in June.

You must subscribe to read all of this.
Log In Subscribe

Bank robber McBain didn’t like being a victim

Poor Kenneth McBain. The serial stick-up bandit and escaped federal convict (inset) who terrorizes bank clerks by waving a loaded .357 handgun in their faces – or firing it into the ceiling – got all choked up describing the time he was a victim of violence, parole records reveal.

You must subscribe to read all of this.
Log In Subscribe

Another violent con waltzes away from prison

The handsome, happy dude pictured here is the latest escapee with a record of violent crimes to flee a minimum-security prison in Kingston, Ontario – penitentiary capital of Canada. Kenneth McBain, 46, disappeared today from Frontenac Institution, the same prison that murderer Andrew Wood fled last month, only to be caught five days later on a secluded backroad in a car with a Corrections Canada psychologist who works at Frontenac, Erin Danto.

You must subscribe to read all of this.
Log In Subscribe